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How globalization changes capitalism, the economy and politics

Wall Street – Washington Connection, Part I

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When we think about the financial crisis on Wall Street and in the economy we try to figure out why it happened, who was responsible and how can we prevent it from happening again in the future. Today we still have a lot more questions than we have answers, but the sun is beginning to shine, and one issue is starting to emerge which probably for years and years has been tucked away from the public’s view.

This crisis is pulling the blanket of secrecy from a bunch of Wall Street bankers smooching and spooning undercover with Washington’s big guys for the last several decades. Of course we would expect them to be somewhat embarrassed about busting their secret arrangements, maybe even flee the scene to break up their unholy unity for good. Much to our surprise none of this is actually happening.

Mr. Dimon, chairman and head of JPMorgan Chase, has sought to ratchet up his business of influencing Washington in late 2007, when the financial crisis hit and the democrats together with the Obama administration were beginning to settle in. Jamie Dimon together with Goldman’s Loyed Blankfein are among a rare breed of executives who have not jeopardized their companies by taking unwise decisions. Both CEOs in the meantime have returned all funds received from Treasury’s capital assistance programs (CAP).

These days JPMorgan’s chairman comes to town about twice a month and not twice a year as he used to. He met with Treasury secretary Geithner, White House economic advisor Lawrence Summers, and several lawmakers in recent months and gets a list from his staff to call a half-dozen public officials each week. He has made it a regular thing to nurse his precious Washington relations to make sure he is not kept out of the loop.

When JPMorgan wanted to return its TARP funds his influential connections helped him to ease the terms for banks allowing them to repay the money. In the end Washington caved in to Dimon’s complaints about limitations for hiring skilled foreigners and on executive pay. He also helped thwart attempts to lower the principal on mortgage payments which would have benefited homeowners.

Another contentious issue is Mr. Dimon’s objection to regulate the market for credit derivatives by keeping part of it independent from regulated clearing operations. Fees from underwriting over-the-counter credit derivatives are a major source of income for JPMorgan Chase.

Mr. Dimon’s connections to Washington date back to his day at Citigroup when he offered Mr. Rahm Emanuel, then senior advisor to president Bill Clinton, a job at the firm. Today Mr. Emanuel serves in the Obama administration as White House Chief of Staff. William Daley, former commerce secretary and influential Chicago lobbyist, is also currently on JPMorgan’s payroll. Mr. Dimon mindfully replaced some of his staff with wired democrats to better serve his Washington agenda. 

Most surprising is his connection to Treasury secretary Geithner. Mr. Dimon holds a seat on the board of the New York Federal Reserve. Mr. Geithner served as president of the NY Fed till he joined the Obama administration in January of this year. How can a CEO of a public company sit on the board of a federal regulator? That’s like John Gotti being a member of the U.S. Department of Justice.

For the first time this Monday JPMorgan Chase held a meeting of the firm’s board in the nation’s capital. Messrs. Geithner and Emanuel were both invited, but only the chief of staff first agreed to later withdraw not to appear too cozy with Wall Street bankers. This invitation is nonetheless testament to the arrogance of invincibility that has shrouded executives of our most powerful corporations.

In Washington nothing gets done without support from Wall Street and Wall Street knows it. Wallshington is more important and influential than the oil industry, the industrial complex or even the powerful military. This has never been so true like it is today with a handful of firms left unfettered from the crisis and government’s control. Their power is more concentrated in the hands of a few and therefore even more difficult to control.

Executives on Wall Street get whatever they wish from every administration or congress there is. This too big to fail monster is sucking the lifeblood of morality, decency and sustainability out of a societal fabric that once was the envy of the rest of the world.

In the latest report for the period ending July 17, 2009, the Treasury department listed employed funds under the Troubled Asset Relieve Program (TARP). The financial industry received $204.2 billion, $70.2 billion have been returned, leaving the industry with a total of $134 billion outstanding. In the automotive industry $77.8 billion from 79.9 are still owed to the taxpayer. Automotive suppliers received a more humble $3.5 billion. Targeted investments in Citygroup and Bank of America totaled $40 billion and asset guarantee programs for Citigroup another $5 billion. The Troubled Asset Loan facility (TALF) committed $20 billion. Rescuing troubled insurer AIG required another $69.8 billion.

To this day the financial and the automotive industry owe the taxpayer $350 billion, yet government has devoted only $18.7 billion in home affordable modification programs to avoid foreclosures. While taxpayers were required to fund the bailout of Wall Street with 350 billion dollars the financial industry is reluctant to modify loans and scores of families are still forced out of their homes.

This current administration with the most eloquent president since years will have a hard time to sell this to the general public. Wall Street firms reverting to old habits by once again doling out mega bonuses to their club members will not make it any easer.

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  1. […] Tagged with audit, bailout, bank lending survey, bank stress test, Barofsky, C&I loans, CAP, common sense, consumer loans, GAO, Geithner, Obama administration, regulators, SIGTARP, small business loans, TARP, Treasury « Wall Street – Washington Connection, Part I […]


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